Michael Lacey A mathematician with a difference

Michael Lacey is a prominent mathematician who has etched his name as one of the finest scholars of his time. Born in 1959, Lacey has gone on to work in various educational institutions across the United States. He attained his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1987 and was guided greatly by Walter Philip. His studies have revolved around subjects such probability, harmonic analysis and ergodic theory.

After his Ph.D., Michael Lacey was employed by both Louisianan state university and the University of North Carolina to serve in various postdoctoral positions. During his time at the University of North Carolina, both Philip and lacey researched widely and came up with a proof of the central limit theorem.

From 1989 to 1996, Michael Lacey worked with Indian university and was awarded a national science foundation postdoctoral fellowship. While undertaking his fellowship, he set out to study and research widely on bilinear Hilbert transform an incomplete study by an Argentinean mathematician, Alberto Calderon. He successfully solved the transform together with Christophe Thiele in 1996 and they were both awarded the prestigious Salem prize.

Since 1996, Lacey has been at Georgia Institute of Technology where he works as a professor of Mathematics. In 2004, Michael Lacey, received Guggenheim fellowship to work jointly with Xiaochun Li. He later became a fellow of the American mathematical society in 2012. The society focuses on providing educational grants to students and supports research in the field of mathematics.

One of his other career highlights was when he solved the law of the iterated logarithm for use in empirical characteristic functions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *